Crain's Detroit Business Wednesday, February 24, 2021

Ann Arbor drug company Asalyxa hauls in $2 million seed funding round

Chemical engineering professor Lola Eniola-Adefeso’s University of Michigan spinout company is featured in Crain’s Detroit Business.

Wired Friday, November 6, 2020

The batteries of the future are weightless and invisible

Irving Langmuir Distinguished University Professor of Chemical Sciences and Engineering Nicholas Kotov is quoted in Wired.

IEEE Spectrum Wednesday, August 19, 2020

A battery that’s tough enough to take structural loads

Irving Langmuir Distinguished University Professor of Chemical Sciences and Engineering Nicholas Kotov is quoted in IEEE Spectrum.

Engadget Wednesday, August 19, 2020

This super strength body battery is made with discarded Kevlar

Irving Langmuir Distinguished University Professor of Chemical Sciences and Engineering Nicholas Kotov is quoted in Engadget.

Business Insider Wednesday, May 20, 2020

You probably won’t catch the coronavirus from swimming. It’s the crowds on the beach that matter.

CEE Associate Professor Krista Wigginton explains that risk factors for outdoor activities are mostly dependent on crowd size and density.

NBC Tuesday, April 9, 2019

Artificial blood vessels that come to life could improve medical care. Here’s why.

Lola Eniola-Adefeso, professor of chemical engineering and biomedical engineering, discusses “promising” new research results on bioengineered blood vessels with NBC News, though cautions that there’s much to learn about how the vessels perform.

R&D Magazine Thursday, April 4, 2019

Graphene oxide technology provides alternative to biopsy

Sunitha Nagrath, associate professor of CHE, explains the significance of new device.

In the News Wednesday, February 6, 2019

University of Michigan researchers tout high-speed 3D printing approach

3D resin printing that’s stronger and 100 times faster than traditional methods is detailed.

In the News Friday, February 1, 2019

Solid electrolyte enables light batteries to replace structural elements

IEEE Spectrum Thursday, January 24, 2019

This 3D printing technique is 100 times faster than standard 3D printers

CHE Associate Professor Timothy Scott explains how Michigan Engineering’s printing method improves over typical methods.